SHOOT TO KILL: Thailand and the War on Drugs in 2003

 The title comes from the alleged “shoot-to-kill” policy behind the mass murders, described by many, including in the January 24th, 2008 edition of The Economist (as cited in Wikipedia):

 The title comes from the alleged “shoot-to-kill” policy behind the mass murders, described by many, including in the January 24th, 2008 edition of The Economist (as cited in Wikipedia):

“…a panel set up last year by the outgoing junta recently concluded the opposite: over half of those killed in 2003 had no links to the drugs trade. The panel blamed the violence on a government “shoot-to-kill” policy based on flawed blacklists. But far from leading to the prosecutions of those involved, its findings have been buried. The outgoing interim prime minister, Surayud Chulanont, took office vowing to right Mr Thaksin’s wrongs. Yet this week he said there was insufficient evidence to take legal action over the killings. It is easy to see why the tide has turned. Sunai Phasuk, a researcher for Human Rights Watch, a lobbying group, says that the panel’s original report named the politicians who egged on the gunmen. But after the PPP won last month’s elections, those names were omitted.”